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jewelry companies This might be my favorite. | My Other Fandoms
This might be my favorite.
Bristols lost Roman mosaic goes back on display

The Orpheus mosaic shows him seated on a bench playing a kithara, a type of lyre. He wears a cap, a belted tunic, a cloak and high boots. A fox leaps up towards the kithara on his right, and seven animals run to or from each other around him. There are a lion, hind, bear, bull, leopard, stag and another feline possibly a panther. It is thought that the design was modified since the animals are arranged in pairs except for the bear. Perhaps it was reduced in size to fit a smaller room.

From Victorian times, the mosaic was mentioned occasionally. For a long time it was thought to have been lost.

In the early 1990s, Bristols art librarian Anthony Beeson, who was also archivist for the Association for the Study and Preservation of Roman Mosaics, led a small team which sorted the bits and reassembled the enormous jigsaw.

It took several years and in 2000, visitors to Bristol Museum and Art Gallery could watch the work as it progressed in the front hall. Anthony told Bristol Times: In being persistent I managed to rescue a piece of Roman art for the nation, which was very satisfying.